The Creativity Crisis: It’s Getting Worse

In this very special guest post by Professor KH Kim, we find out the updated facts of what is happening to people’s creativity levels over the past decades, now with updated statistics for 2017. This is a follow-up to what I consider to be one of the most important pieces of creativity research from the past decade.

Children are born to be creative, like eagles are born to soar, see the world, and find food, not scratch and fight for scraps in a coop. Instead of competing against each other on memorization tests, when children utilize their creativity to its full potential, creativity can contribute to healthy lives and future careers.

How High-Stakes Testing Has Caused Exam Hell in Asia

High-stakes testing has shaped the main Asian cultural values: 1) filial piety (e.g., to be a good son or daughter by achieving high scores), 2) social conformity (e.g., to think and act like others); and 3) social hierarchy (e.g., to obey the authority). High-stakes testing has made millions of young men focus on preparing for tests, instead of challenging the social hierarchy. It has resulted in exam hell, the excessive rote memorization and private tutoring, starting in early childhood, to achieve high scores among students in Asia. This situation has fostered social conformity and structural inequalities. It has cost Asians their individuality and creativity.

How High-Stakes Testing Has Caused The Creativity Crisis in the U.S.

During the 1990s, American politicians, fearing the educational and economic success of Asia, began to focus on test-taking skills to emulate Asian success.  Today, high-stakes testing costs American taxpayers tens of billions of dollars each year, but the real cost is much higher

Highly-selective university and graduate school admission procedures rely on high-stakes tests such as the ACT and the SAT. Testing companies and test-preparation companies have reaped enormous financial benefits and lobby Congres heavily for more testing.  However, because students’ scores are highly correlated with both students’ family income and spending on test preparations, high-stakes testing has solidified structural inequalities and socioeconomic barriers for low-income families.

American Education Before and After the 1990s

Creativity is making something unique and useful and often produces innovation. Prior to the 1990s, American education cultivated, inspired, and encouraged.  However, since the 1990s:

Losing curiosities and passions. Because of the incentives or sanctions on schools and teachers based on students’ test scores, schools have turned to rote lecturing to teach all tested material and spent time teaching specific test-taking skills. Students memorize information without opportunities for application. This approach stifles natural curiosities, the joy of learning, and exploring topics that might lead to their passions.

Narrowing visions. Making test scores as the measure of success fosters students’ competition and narrows their goals, such as getting rich, while decreasing their empathy and compassion for those in need. However, the greatest innovators in history were inspired by big visions such as changing the world. Their big visions helped their minds transcend the concrete constraints or limitations and recognize patterns or relationships among the unrelated.

Prior to the 1990s, many schools had high expectations and offered many challenges. However, since the 1990s:

Lowering expectations. Schools focus on students whose scores are just below passing score and ignore high-achieving students.

Avoiding risk-taking. High-stakes testing teaches students to avoid taking risks for fear of being wrong. The willingness to accept failure is essential for creativity.

Prior to the 1990s, educators sought to provide students with diverse experiences and views.  However, since the 1990s:

Avoiding collaboration. Because teachers have been compelled to depend on rote lecturing, students have few opportunities for group work or discussions to learn and collaborate with others.

Narrowing minds. Schools have decreased or eliminated instruction time on non-tested subjects such as social studies, science, physical education, arts, and foreign languages. This contraction not only narrows students’ minds but gives them few opportunities for finding or expressing their individuality and cross-pollination across different subjects or fields. Low-income area schools, especially, have decreased time on non-tested subjects to spend more time on test preparations.

Prior to the 1990s, schools provided children with the freedom to think alone and differently. However, since the 1990s:

Losing imagination and deep thought. Test-centric education has reduced children’s playtime, which stifles imagination. With pressure to cover large amounts of tested material, teachers overfeed students with information, leaving students little time to think or explore concepts in depth.

Fostering conformity. American education has increasingly fostered conformity, clipping eagles’ wings of individuality (All schools preparing students for the same tests and all students taking the same tests). It has stifled uniqueness and originality in both educators and students. Wing-clipped eagles cannot do what they were born to do – fly; individuality-clipped children cannot do what they were born to do – fulfill their creative potential.

Fostering hierarchy. Students’ low scores are often due to structural inequalities, which start in early childhood (e.g., the number of words exposed to by age 3), affecting their later academic achievement. Yet, high-stakes testing has determined the deservingness and un-deservingness of passers or failers.   The claim of “meritocracy” has disguised the structural inequalities by conditioning disadvantaged students to blame themselves for their lack of effort.

Results of The 2017 Creativity Crisis Study

In “The Creativity Crisis (2011)” I reported that American creativity declined from the 1990s to 2008. Since 2008, my research reveals that the Creativity Crisis has grown worse. In addition, the results also reveal that the youngest age groups (5 and 6-year-olds) suffered the greatest.

The significant declines in outbox thinking skills (fluid and original thinking) indicate that Americans generate not only fewer ideas or solutions to open-ended questions or challenges, but also fewer unusual or unique ideas than those in preceding decades (Figure 1).

The significant declines in newbox thinking skills (elaboration and simplicity) indicate that Americans think less in depth, with less focus, and they think less critically and in more black-and-white terms than those in preceding decades (Figure 2).

The significant decline in open-mindedness (creative attitude) indicates that Americans are less open to new experiences and different people, ideas, and views than those in preceding decades (Figure 3).

The greatest declines in creativity among the youngest age groups suggest that the younger children are, the more they are harmed by American test-centric education.

Similarities between American high-stakes testing and Asian exam hell have appeared. Increasingly, fewer American innovators will emerge. The longer test-centric education continues, the fewer will remember or know that eagles can fly, and the more we will see creativity and innovation decline.  America must not abandon its traditional way of raising eagles. Eagles that soar high will see the whole big world, and children who maximize their potential will become world’s greatest innovators. The world has improved from breakthroughs made by eagles, not by wing-clipped chicks.

Dr. Kim is Professor of Creativity and Innovation at the College of William & Mary  (kkim@wm.edu or Tweet @Kreativity_Kim).

Did you know that scientific evidence shows your creativity decreases over time

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Dr. KH Kim is Professor of Creativity & Innovation at the College of William & Mary. After being an English teacher in Korea for ten years and upon getting her PhD from the University of Georgia, she taught there and then at Eastern Michigan University. She has dedicated her career to researching creativity and innovators. Her research study titled "The Creativity Crisis" was the subject of a 2010 Newsweek cover story that captured the world’s attention. Frequently sought after by the media, she has shared her expertise with numerous outlets including New York Times, Wall Street Journal, U.S. News & World Report, and others. She is the author of The Creativity Challenge: How We Can Recapture American Innovation and has won the Early Scholar Award and the Hollingworth Award from the National Association for Gifted Children, the Berlyne Award from the American Psychology Association, as well as the Torrance Award from the American Creativity Association.
By |2017-04-28T13:18:12+00:00April 28th, 2017|Creativity|8 Comments

8 Comments

  1. Peggy Finely Aarlien May 3, 2017 at 4:52 am - Reply

    Hello fellow alumni! I find your article most interesting while teaching in Seoul, for the last 2 years. Like the Americans, the Welsh too are looking toward Asian model of test-taking to improve thier students’ test performances. See https://youtu.be/aZsYdesxVCg

    I would also add that these 2 factors continue to influence the vicious cycle of funding the actual classroom size.
    Meaning: the justification toward remote test centric learning has allowed 2 trends to result. 1st An increase in the number of children that are present in a given classroom, and thus reduces the opportunities for student-centered collaboration and risk-taking curricula. 2nd As well as, the more number of condensed number of classes within a single day reduces the amount centered on curricula that promotes creativity. For example, having 3 to 4 intense focused courses, 2 or more hours long. Now, many schools adopt 7 courses less than 50 minutes long.
    This restricted physical classroom structure does not contribute to innovative learning styles…as I have myself witnessed in many of the Korean schools here in Seoul. Thank you.

    Peggy Finley Aarlien
    Pfaarl@email.wm.edu

  2. […] The Creativity Crisis: It’s Getting Worse Idea to Value […]

  3. norbert jausovec May 20, 2017 at 9:36 am - Reply

    The main problem with the results of this and all similar studies on creativity is that the construct lacks a valid test for measuring it. Similar research into differences in intelligence (e.g. Flynn effect, or dysgenic fertility) are much more objective, due to a valid instruments to measure it. Hence, anything can be said about the timeline of creativity. But at least in science we have an immense increase in research publications and findings having a great impact on society (e.g., IT technology and robotics).

  4. […] Americans’ creativity skills haven’t improved much since 2008. Kim’s most recent research shows that “outbox” thinking (i.e., fluid and original thinking), as well as “newbox” […]

  5. […] at Idea to Value, Dr. Kim writes that high-stakes testing has stilted children’s […]

  6. […] education system cultivated, inspired, and encouraged students. However, schools have turned to rote lecturing since then to improve children’s exam scores and test-taking skills. Given the circumstances, it […]

  7. […] The Creativity Crisis: It’s Getting Worse. (2015). Retrieved July 15, 2018, from Idea To Value: https://www.ideatovalue.com/crea/khkim/2017/04/creativity-crisis-getting-worse/ […]

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